Lollypop AdLib Music

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In 1994, the side-scrolling 2D platform game Lollypop was released for DOS, and in 1995 for Amiga. It was developed by Brain Bug and released by Rainbow Arts, featuring music and sound effects by Vibrants.

lollypop_title_screenlollypop_main_menu

This blog post contains all the AdLib music made for the DOS version, saved as MP3 for easy listening. Most of it was composed by Thomas Mogensen (Drax) and Torben Hansen (Metal) in EdLib.

The peripheral tunes made use of all nine channels that the OPL2 chip supported. However, the level tunes only made use of five to make room for the sound effects in the remaining four channels.

Peripheral tunes

Title Tune
1993-94 Vibrants

Hiscore
1993-94 Vibrants

Congratulations
1993-94 Vibrants

My Favorite SID Tunes by Laxity

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Thomas Egeskov Petersen, known as Laxity in the European C64 demo scene, composed more than 200 SID tunes on the Commodore 64 from 1987 and up, most of them in his own music player.

Question: SID tunes? What's that?

SID tunes are chiptunes created on the Commodore 64, or an emulation of the C64 or its SID chip.

The SID chip in the Commodore 64 was quite advanced in 1982. It had three channels across eight octaves, ADSR, four different waveforms, pulsating on the square waveform, three ring modulators, and multi mode filtering. The music players written for it were usually called 50 times a second, quickly changing waveforms and frequencies to simulate vibrato, drums and arpeggio chords.

I’ve been listening through all of Laxity’s tunes in the latest High Voltage SID Collection which was at #65 at the time of publishing this blog post. I selected more than 180 tunes I liked and created stereo MP3 files for easy listening here. You could call it sort of “Laxity’s Greatest Hits” as compiled by JCH.

21.G4 Demo Tune #1
2005 Vibrants / Maniacs of Noise
One of three demo tunes Laxity made to test music player v21.G4 for my music editor.

21.G4 Demo Tune #2
2005 Vibrants / Maniacs of Noise

21.G4 Demo Tune #3
2005 Vibrants / Maniacs of Noise

My Favorite SID Tunes by JCH

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Wait, who is this JCH now? What a silly abbreviation. Just using his initials – how uninspired. Must be some kind of idiot. Anyway, it says here that he was active on the Commodore 64 from 1987 to 1992.

Question: SID tunes? What's that?

SID tunes are chiptunes created on the Commodore 64, or an emulation of the C64 or its SID chip.

The SID chip in the Commodore 64 was quite advanced in 1982. It had three channels across eight octaves, ADSR, four different waveforms, pulsating on the square waveform, three ring modulators, and multi mode filtering. The music players written for it were usually called 50 times a second, quickly changing waveforms and frequencies to simulate vibrato, drums and arpeggio chords.

I’ve been listening through all of my own tunes in the latest High Voltage SID Collection which was at #65 at the time of publishing this blog post. I selected approximately 200 tunes and created stereo MP3 files for easy listening here. You could call it sort of “JCH’s Greatest Hits” as compiled by… uh… JCH. Yes.

42nd Street
1989 Vibrants
The name refers to the fact that the tune plays for 42 seconds before looping.

Abstract #1
1989 Vibrants

Accident
1989-90 Vibrants
Cooperation between MSK and JCH. The bassline was taken from some pop hit by George Michael.

My Favorite SID Tunes by Jozz

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The Danish pianist Johannes Bjerregaard created a few hundred SID tunes on the Commodore 64 and is regarded as one of the most brilliant C64 composers of all time. He was active from 1986 to 1990.

Question: SID tunes? What's that?

SID tunes are chiptunes created on the Commodore 64, or an emulation of the C64 or its SID chip.

The SID chip in the Commodore 64 was quite advanced in 1982. It had three channels across eight octaves, ADSR, four different waveforms, pulsating on the square waveform, three ring modulators, and multi mode filtering. The music players written for it were usually called 50 times a second, quickly changing waveforms and frequencies to simulate vibrato, drums and arpeggio chords.

I’ve been listening through all of his tunes in the latest High Voltage SID Collection which was at #65 at the time of publishing this blog post. I noted down 78 tunes I liked and created stereo MP3 files for easy listening here. You could call it sort of “Johannes Bjerregaard’s Greatest Hits” as compiled by JCH.

Again It’s JB
1989 Johannes Bjerregaard

Alf TV Theme
1988 Johannes Bjerregaard
Conversion of the theme from the TV show “Alf” by Tom Kramer and Alf Clausen.

Balloon
1990 Johannes Bjerregaard

My Favorite SID Tunes by Future Freak

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Kim Christensen, known as Future Freak in the European C64 demo scene, barely released more than two dozens of tunes on the Commodore 64. He was only active from 1987 to 1989.

Question: SID tunes? What's that?

SID tunes are chiptunes created on the Commodore 64, or an emulation of the C64 or its SID chip.

The SID chip in the Commodore 64 was quite advanced in 1982. It had three channels across eight octaves, ADSR, four different waveforms, pulsating on the square waveform, three ring modulators, and multi mode filtering. The music players written for it were usually called 50 times a second, quickly changing waveforms and frequencies to simulate vibrato, drums and arpeggio chords.

I’ve been listening through Future Freak’s tunes in the latest High Voltage SID Collection which was at #65 at the time of publishing this blog post. I picked 18 out of the 25 tunes I liked and created stereo MP3 files for easy listening here. You could call it sort of “Future Freak’s Greatest Hits” as compiled by JCH.

All of the tunes also have mono MP3 alternatives from SOASC created using a real C64.

An Old One
1987 Dexion SOASC
Made in Rob Hubbard’s music player.

Chopper
1989 Flexible Arts SOASC
Made in Laxity’s music player.

Cooperation Demo
1987 New Life / Dexion / Zargon SOASC
Made in Jeroen Kimmel’s music player (perhaps better known as Red).

My Favorite SID Tunes by Link

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Klaus Gr√łngaard, known as Link in the European C64 demo scene, was the first person to use my music editor on the Commodore 64. He was active from 1989 to 1991 and created more than 150 tunes.

Question: SID tunes? What's that?

SID tunes are chiptunes created on the Commodore 64, or an emulation of the C64 or its SID chip.

The SID chip in the Commodore 64 was quite advanced in 1982. It had three channels across eight octaves, ADSR, four different waveforms, pulsating on the square waveform, three ring modulators, and multi mode filtering. The music players written for it were usually called 50 times a second, quickly changing waveforms and frequencies to simulate vibrato, drums and arpeggio chords.

I’ve been listening through all of Link’s tunes in the latest High Voltage SID Collection which was at #65 at the time of publishing this blog post. I noted down the 32 tunes I liked and created stereo MP3 files for easy listening here. You could call it sort of “Link’s Greatest Hits” as compiled by JCH.

Most of the tunes also have mono MP3 alternatives from SOASC created using a real C64.

Abnormal
1989 Vibrants SOASC

Action Guy
1990 Vibrants SOASC

American
1991 Vibrants SOASC
The bassline and synth riff in the first 15 seconds was taken from “You’re the One For Me” by D. Train.

My Favorite SID Tunes by Drax

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Thomas Mogensen, known as Drax in the European C64 demo scene, created almost a thousand SID tunes on the Commodore 64 from 1987 and up. Most of these were composed in my music editor.

Question: SID tunes? What's that?

SID tunes are chiptunes created on the Commodore 64, or an emulation of the C64 or its SID chip.

The SID chip in the Commodore 64 was quite advanced in 1982. It had three channels across eight octaves, ADSR, four different waveforms, pulsating on the square waveform, three ring modulators, and multi mode filtering. The music players written for it were usually called 50 times a second, quickly changing waveforms and frequencies to simulate vibrato, drums and arpeggio chords.

I’ve been listening through all of Drax’s tunes in the latest High Voltage SID Collection which was at #65 at the time of publishing this blog post. I noted down more than 100 tunes I liked and created stereo MP3 files for easy listening here. You could call it sort of “Drax’s Greatest Hits” as compiled by JCH.

Most of the tunes also have mono MP3 alternatives from SOASC created using a real C64.

24th Amaranth Grand Prix – Selector #1
1991 Vibrants SOASC
24th Amaranth Grand Prix was supposed to be a racing game similar to Out Run, only here you were riding a motorcycle instead. It was never finished.

24th Amaranth Grand Prix – Selector #2
1991 Vibrants SOASC

24th Amaranth Grand Prix – Selector #3
1991 Vibrants SOASC

Associations: Task III vs Omikron

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Task III (C64) and Omikron: The Nomad Soul (PC)
Task III (Commodore 64) and Omikron: The Nomad Soul (PC and Dreamcast).

With my past as a composer on the Commodore 64, naturally I was interested in all games with unique music back in the day. One of these was Task III from 1987 with great SID music by Frank Endler. Especially the high score tune had a special “mashing” style that I really liked:

It may be a little odd to begin with, but hang in there. There are a few cute changes here and there, especially at 0:41 and 1:00.

In 2001, I completed Omikron: The Nomad Soul on the PC. The game was actually released in 1999 on PC and was a bold attempt at creating a hybrid of third person adventure, fighting, as well as first person shooter. It was quite atmospheric and even had in-game music by David Bowie.

Maniacs of Noise

If you check out my About page, you’ll see that I have a past as a programmer and composer on the Commodore 64 and PC. I used to be part of the demo scene where loads of demos and chiptunes were released both to entertain and of course to brag about our abilities.

Although I stopped messing around with that stuff in the end of the 90’s, I still keep an eye on it in Facebook where I have several nostalgic friends that used to be part of this old scene. I have also liked a few relevant groups and fan pages.

One of the giants of the old Commodore 64 scene was Maniacs of Noise. They made excellent music both for demos and for games such as Cybernoid, Myth and Turbo Outrun. Their compositions and instruments were often of an unprecedented high quality.

Recently, Maniacs of Noise opened a fan page on Facebook, and here they posted a massive tune lasting 23 minutes with contributions from Jeroen Tel (NL), Mick Rippon (AU), Thomas Mogensen (DK) and Thomas Egeskov Petersen (DK). You can also check it out here: